5 March 2018

There are many good ways to teach mathematics

There are many good ways to teach mathematics and statistics Hiding in the bookshelves in the University of Otago Library, I wept as I read the sentence, “There are many good ways to raise children.”  As a mother of a baby with severe disabilities the burden to get it right weighed down on me. This statement told me to put down the burden. I could do things differently from other mothers, and none of us needed to be wrong. The same is true of teaching maths and stats – “There are many good ways to teach mathematics and statistics.” (Which […]
31 March 2014

Teaching Confidence Intervals

If you want your students to understand just two things about confidence intervals, what would they be? What and what order When making up a teaching plan for anything it is important to think about whom you are teaching, what it is you want them to learn, and what order will best achieve the most important desired outcomes. In my previous life as a university professor I mostly taught confidence intervals to business students, including MBAs. Currently I produce materials to help teach high school students. When teaching business students, I was aware that many of them had poor mathematics […]
17 March 2014

The silent dog – null results matter too!

Recently I was discussing the process we use in a statistical enquiry. The ideal is that we start with a problem and follow the statistical enquiry cycle through the steps Problem, Plan, Data collection, Analysis and Conclusion, which then may lead to other enquiries.  I have previously written a post suggesting that the cyclical nature of the process was overstated. The context of our discussion was a video I am working on, that acknowledges that often we start, not at the beginning, but in the middle, with a set of data. This may be because in an educational setting it […]
23 September 2013

On-line learning and teaching resources

Twenty-first century Junior Woodchuck Guidebook I grew up reading Donald Duck comics. I love the Junior Woodchucks, and their Junior Woodchuck Guidebook. The Guidebook is a small paperback book, containing information on every conceivable subject, including geography, mythology, history, literature and the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.  In our family, when we want to know something or check some piece of information, we talk about consulting the Junior Woodchuck Guidebook. (Imagine my joy when I discovered that a woodchuck is another name for a groundhog, the star of my favourite movie!) What we are referring to is the internet, the source […]
9 September 2013

How to study statistics (Part 1)

To students of statistics Most of my posts are directed at teachers and how to teach statistics. The blog this week and next is devoted to students. I present principles that will help you to learn statistics. I’m turning them into a poster, which I will make available for you to printing later. I’d love to hear from other teachers as I add to my list of principles. 1. Statistics is learned by doing One of the best predictors of success in any subject is how much time you spent on it. If you want to learn statistics, you need […]
21 January 2013

Statistics or Calculus? Do both!

This post is prompted by two 17 year old boys, Cam and Thomas, who are about to enter year 13, the final year of High school in New Zealand. They are both academically capable, with highly educated parents. And both boys are struggling with a dilemma – should they  take Calculus or Statistics at school this year. I suspect their maths teachers are pushing for calculus, whereas their parents appreciate the value of statistics. Let’s take a look at the alternatives and see if we can help. (This makes no pretense of being a balanced view – that’s what comments […]
17 December 2012

Organising the toolbox in statistics and operations research

Don’t bury students in tools      In our statistics courses and textbooks there is a tendency to hand our students tool after tool, wanting to teach them all they need to know. However students can feel buried under these tools and unable to decide which to use for which task. This is also true in beginning Operations Research or Management Science courses. To the instructors, it is obvious whether to use the test for paired or independent samples or whether to use multicriteria decision making or a decision tree.  But it is just another source of confusion for the […]
19 November 2012

The Sound of Music meets Linear Programming

“Let’s start at the very beginning – a very good place to start. When you read you begin with A, B,C!” When you do statistics you begin with…probability? the mean? graphs? Begin at the end But really, is the beginning a very good place to start? Sometimes, we need to begin at the end. And sometimes we need to go back before the beginning. Always we need to think about where to begin, because it is seldom obvious, and copying what other teachers and textbooks have done is often a bad idea. Linear programming Take Linear Programming, the flagship technique […]
23 July 2012

Question questions

Ooooh – new data! There is nothing like a new set of data, just sitting there in the computer, all ready for me to clean and graph and analyse and extract its secrets. I know I should be methodical in my approach, but sometimes I feel like a kid at Christmas, metaphorically ripping open the presents as I jump from graph to procedure, and back to graph again. I then have to go back and do it properly, documenting my approach and recording results, but that’s okay too. That can reveal a second lot of wonders as I sift and […]
30 April 2012

Embrace Change

I love graduations. At the University of Canterbury the academic staff act as marshals, helping the graduands to be in the right place at the right time in the right order wearing the right clothes and doing the right things. I have acted as a marshal for some years and love helping people to have a good experience. I love graduations because of the accomplishment they represent, and the efforts the student, the parents and the staff have made for these young people to complete their qualifications. This graduation was pretty special, as it was the class that had to […]