26 February 2019

What Maths Teachers wish Year 9 students knew

What do high school teachers want from their students when they arrive in Year 9? This is an important question. One of the biggest jumps in education in New Zealand is from primary/intermediate (years 1 to 8) to secondary (Years 9 to 13). In most cases children are taught by generalist teachers in primary/intermediate (which I will call primary from now on) and by specialist maths teachers at secondary school. Please be clear that this is NOT a criticism of Primary teachers. Primary teachers do an amazing job teaching such a wide range of subjects in a crowded curriculum to […]
16 January 2019

Learning Progression Framework – A good idea or a poor use of time?

Not all that is good needs to be done That something is a good thing to do and will improve learning outcomes for all students, is not sufficient reason for doing it. I have recently become aware of the Learning Progression Framework. As explained in a previous post, there are multiple ways of expressing the level of learning in maths for learners in New Zealand schools, including the New Zealand curriculum (broad brush), Numeracy project stages (fine uni-dimensional and embraced by Primary teachers) and National Standards (no longer current, but casting a long shadow.) To this the LPF adds steps, […]
3 December 2018

I just need to pass the course: instrumental learning and statistics

I am interested in instrumental motivation, when a learner is doing a course of study in order to get a piece of paper – a qualification, which is generally the means to an end. I suspect that many students of statistics have instrumental motivation and I am interested in what affect that has on their learning and on the teacher of the course. Personal experience of learning All my life I have been a high-achieving, engaged learner. I liked to learn and to become more knowledgeable. I still like to learn and am not interested in any more qualifications. I […]
15 February 2017

Educating the heart with maths and statistics

What has love got to do with maths? This morning at the Twitter chat for teachers, (#bfc630nz) the discussion question was, How and what will you teach your students about life this year? As I lurked I was impressed at the ideas and ideals expressed by a mixed bunch of teachers from throughout New Zealand. I tweeted:  “I wonder how often maths teachers think about educating the heart. Yet maths affects how people feel so much.” My teaching philosophy is summed up as “head, heart and hands”. I find the philosophy of constructivism appealing, that people create their own understanding […]
12 December 2016

Has the Numeracy Project failed?

The Numeracy Development Project has influenced the teaching of mathematics in New Zealand. It has changed the language people use to talk about mathematical understanding, introducing the terms “multiplicative thinking”, “part-whole” and “proportional reasoning” to the teacher toolkit. It has empowered some teachers to think differently about the teaching of mathematics. It has brought “number” front and centre, often crowding out algebra, geometry, measurement and statistics, which are now commonly called the strands. It has baffled a large number of parents. Has the Numeracy Development Project been a success? If not, how can we fix it? I have been pondering […]
14 July 2016

Enriching mathematics with statistics

Statistics enriches everything! In many school systems in the world, subjects are taught separately. In primary school, children  learn reading and writing, maths and social studies at different times of the day. But more than that, many topics within subjects are also taught separately. In mathematics we often teach computational skills, geometry, measurement and statistics in separate topics throughout the school year. Textbooks tend to encourage this segmentation of the curriculum. This causes problems as students compartmentalise their learning.  They think that something learned in mathematics can’t possibly be used in Physics. They complain in mathematics if they are asked […]
8 March 2016

Papamoa College statistics excursion to Hamilton Zoo

Last week I had a lovely experience. I visited the Hamilton Observatory and Zoo as part of a Statistics excursion with the Year 13 statistics class of Papamoa College. The trip was organised to help students learn about where data comes from. I went along because I really love teachers and students, and it was an opportunity to experience innovation by a team of wonderful teachers.  The students travelled from Papamoa to Hamilton, stopping for pizza in Cambridge. When we got to the Hamilton Observatory, Dave welcomed us and gave an excellent talk about the stars and data. I found […]
6 October 2014

A Statistics-centric curriculum

Calculus is the wrong summit of the pyramid. “The mathematics curriculum that we have is based on a foundation of arithmetic and algebra. And everything we learn after that is building up towards one subject. And at top of that pyramid, it’s calculus. And I’m here to say that I think that that is the wrong summit of the pyramid … that the correct summit — that all of our students, every high school graduate should know — should be statistics: probability and statistics.” Ted talk by Arthur Benjamin in February 2009. Watch it – it’s only 3 minutes long. […]
31 March 2014

Teaching Confidence Intervals

If you want your students to understand just two things about confidence intervals, what would they be? What and what order When making up a teaching plan for anything it is important to think about whom you are teaching, what it is you want them to learn, and what order will best achieve the most important desired outcomes. In my previous life as a university professor I mostly taught confidence intervals to business students, including MBAs. Currently I produce materials to help teach high school students. When teaching business students, I was aware that many of them had poor mathematics […]
30 September 2013

Those who can, teach statistics

The phrase I despise more than any in popular use (and believe me there are many contenders) is “Those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” I like many of the sayings of George Bernard Shaw, but this one is dismissive, and ignorant and born of jealousy. To me, the ability to teach something is a step higher than being able to do it. The PhD, the highest qualification in academia, is a doctorate. The word “doctor” comes from the Latin word for teacher. Teaching is a noble profession, on which all other noble professions rest. Teachers are generally […]