9 January 2018

Videos for teaching and learning statistics

It delights me that several of my statistics videos have been viewed over half a million times each. As well there is a stream of lovely comments (with the odd weird one) from happy viewers, who have found in the videos an answer to their problems. In this post I will outline the main videos available on the Statistics Learning Centre YouTube Channel. They already belong to 24,000 playlists and lists of recommended resources in textbooks the world over. We are happy for teachers and learners to continue to link to them. Having them all in one place should make […]
23 September 2013

On-line learning and teaching resources

Twenty-first century Junior Woodchuck Guidebook I grew up reading Donald Duck comics. I love the Junior Woodchucks, and their Junior Woodchuck Guidebook. The Guidebook is a small paperback book, containing information on every conceivable subject, including geography, mythology, history, literature and the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.  In our family, when we want to know something or check some piece of information, we talk about consulting the Junior Woodchuck Guidebook. (Imagine my joy when I discovered that a woodchuck is another name for a groundhog, the star of my favourite movie!) What we are referring to is the internet, the source […]
2 September 2013

Open Letter to Khan Academy about Basic Probability

Khan academy probability videos and exercises aren’t good either Dear Mr Khan You have created an amazing resource that thousands of people all over the world get a lot of help from. Well done. Some of your materials are not very good, though, so I am writing this open letter in the hope that it might make some difference. Like many others, I believe that something as popular as Khan Academy will benefit from constructive criticism. I fear that the reason that so many people like your mathematics videos so much is not because the videos are good, but because […]
24 June 2013

Difficult concepts in statistics

Recently someone asked: “I don’t suppose you’d like to blog a little on the pedagogical knowledge relevant to statistics teaching, would you? A ‘top five statistics student misconceptions (and what to do about them)’ would be kind of a nice thing to see …” I wish it were that easy. Here goes: Things that I have found students find difficult to understand and what I have done about them. Observations When I taught second year regression we would get students to collect data and fit their own multiple regressions. The interesting thing was that quite often students would collect unrelated […]
22 May 2012

Significance

In statistical analysis the word “significant” means that there is evidence that effect found in the sample exists in the population from which the sample was drawn. The choice of the word “significant” is unfortunate, as it is used to mean something different in common language. Reporters hear a scientist say that there is a significant effect, and tend to think big. Results gets reported as significant, meaning big, and we have effect inflation. In reality, if we take a large enough sample, even a small effect will show up as significant. Because the sample is large, it is easier […]
10 February 2012

Effective multimedia teaching videos

I have converted lectures into considerably shorter videos that students view at their own time and pace, and as many times as they like. Hosted on YouTube, they are open to an international audience and have proved popular. Here are some tips that may be useful to other instructors interested in doing likewise. (Though teachers of statistics, Excel or linear programming are welcome to use ours!) Pictures and words As much as possible two channels, pictures and words are used. Narration and illustrations complement each other. There are no talking heads. There is considerable research regarding the effectiveness of multimedia […]