9 January 2018

Videos for teaching and learning statistics

It delights me that several of my statistics videos have been viewed over half a million times each. As well there is a stream of lovely comments (with the odd weird one) from happy viewers, who have found in the videos an answer to their problems. In this post I will outline the main videos available on the Statistics Learning Centre YouTube Channel. They already belong to 24,000 playlists and lists of recommended resources in textbooks the world over. We are happy for teachers and learners to continue to link to them. Having them all in one place should make […]
14 October 2016

Play and learning mathematics and statistics

The role of play in learning I have been reading further about teaching mathematics and came across this interesting assertion: Play, understood as something frivolous, opposed to work, off-task behaviour, is not welcomed into most mathematics classrooms. But play is exactly what is needed. It is only play that can entice us to the type of repetition that is needed to learn how to inhabit the mathematical landscape and how to create new mathematics. Friesen(2000) – unpublished thesis, cited in Stordy, Children Count, (2015) Play and practice It is an appealing idea that as children play, they have opportunities to […]
6 September 2016

The nature of mathematics and statistics and what it means to learn and teach them

I’ve been thinking lately…. Sometimes it pays to stop and think. I have been reading a recent textbook for mathematics teachers, Dianne Siemon et al, Teaching mathematics: foundations to middle years (2011). On page 47 the authors asked me to “Take a few minutes to write down your own views about the nature of mathematics, mathematics learning and mathematics teaching.” And bearing in mind I see statistics as related to, but not enclosed by mathematics, I decided to do the same for statistics as well. So here are my thoughts: The nature of mathematics Mathematics is a way of modelling and […]
18 August 2014

Teaching random variables and distributions

Why do we teach about random variables, and why is it so difficult to understand? Probability and statistics go together pretty well and basic probability is included in most introductory statistics courses. Often maths teachers prefer the probability section as it is more mathematical than inference or exploratory data analysis. Both probability and statistics deal with the idea of uncertainty and chance, statistics mostly being about what has happened, and probability about what might happen. Probability can be, and often is, reduced to fun little algebraic puzzles, with little link to reality. But a sound understanding of the concept of […]
23 May 2014

Introducing Probability

I have a guilty secret. I really love probability problems. I am so happy to be making videos about probability just now, and conditional probability and distributions and all that fun stuff. I am a little disappointed that we won’t be doing decision trees with Bayesian review, calculating EVPI. That is such fun, but I gave up teaching that some years ago. The reason probability is fun is because it is really mathematics, and puzzles and logic. I love permutations and combinations too – there is something cool about working out how many ways something can happen. So why should I […]
31 March 2014

Teaching Confidence Intervals

If you want your students to understand just two things about confidence intervals, what would they be? What and what order When making up a teaching plan for anything it is important to think about whom you are teaching, what it is you want them to learn, and what order will best achieve the most important desired outcomes. In my previous life as a university professor I mostly taught confidence intervals to business students, including MBAs. Currently I produce materials to help teach high school students. When teaching business students, I was aware that many of them had poor mathematics […]
30 September 2013

Those who can, teach statistics

The phrase I despise more than any in popular use (and believe me there are many contenders) is “Those who can, do, and those who can’t, teach.” I like many of the sayings of George Bernard Shaw, but this one is dismissive, and ignorant and born of jealousy. To me, the ability to teach something is a step higher than being able to do it. The PhD, the highest qualification in academia, is a doctorate. The word “doctor” comes from the Latin word for teacher. Teaching is a noble profession, on which all other noble professions rest. Teachers are generally […]
2 September 2013

Open Letter to Khan Academy about Basic Probability

Khan academy probability videos and exercises aren’t good either Dear Mr Khan You have created an amazing resource that thousands of people all over the world get a lot of help from. Well done. Some of your materials are not very good, though, so I am writing this open letter in the hope that it might make some difference. Like many others, I believe that something as popular as Khan Academy will benefit from constructive criticism. I fear that the reason that so many people like your mathematics videos so much is not because the videos are good, but because […]
10 June 2013

The flipped classroom

Back in the mid1980s I was a trainee teacher at a high school in Rotorua. My associate teacher commented that she didn’t like to give homework much of the time as the students tended to practise things wrong, thus entrenching bad habits away from her watchful gaze. She had  a very good point! Bad habits can easily be developed when practising solving equations, trigonometry, geometry. Recently the idea of the “flipped classroom” has gained traction, particularly enabled by near universal access to internet technology in some schools or neighbourhoods. When one “flips” the classroom, the students spend their homework time […]
20 May 2013

Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Pedagogical content knowledge for Statistics Pedagogical content knowledge means knowing how to teach a specific subject, discipline or context. There is a school of thought that the skill of teaching is transferable between subjects, so long as the teacher knows the content. However others argue that teaching strategies differ sufficiently across disciplines to create individual but overlapping bodies of knowledge, called pedagogical content knowledge. To me it is clear that different skills and approaches are needed in the teaching of different disciplines. The methods for teaching a foreign language differ largely from those for teaching history or science or cake […]