5 August 2013

Parts and whole

The whole may be greater than the sum of the parts, but the whole still needs those parts. A reflective teacher will think carefully about when to concentrate on the whole, and when on the parts. Golf If you were teaching someone golf, you wouldn’t spend days on a driving range, never going out on a course. Your student would not get the idea of what the game is, or why they need to be able to drive straight and to a desired length. Nor would it be much fun! Similarly if the person only played games of golf it […]
24 June 2013

Difficult concepts in statistics

Recently someone asked: “I don’t suppose you’d like to blog a little on the pedagogical knowledge relevant to statistics teaching, would you? A ‘top five statistics student misconceptions (and what to do about them)’ would be kind of a nice thing to see …” I wish it were that easy. Here goes: Things that I have found students find difficult to understand and what I have done about them. Observations When I taught second year regression we would get students to collect data and fit their own multiple regressions. The interesting thing was that quite often students would collect unrelated […]
25 March 2013

Less is more

“Less is More” is a bit of a funny title for a mathematical blog! Garlic bread and Ice Cream Sundaes Back in the seventies, garlic bread became very popular in our household. I loved its buttery, salty, garlicky goodness, and made it quite often. One time I decided that if a little bit of garlic was yummy, then lots of garlic would be even more delicious. I was wrong! The garlic bread was barely edible, and the house and its occupants gave off a distinctive aroma for several days. More garlic did not mean “better”. From then on whenever I […]
1 October 2012

Statistical muscle memory

I am forever grateful to the teachers at my convent high school. In my first year I was required to take thirteen different subjects, one of which was typing. At the time computers were still objects mainly occurring in science fiction and operated by punch-cards, but the nuns thought we should get a wide exposure to different subjects (just in case I decided to be a typist/linguist/artist/scientist… instead of a maths teacher). Consequently I can touch-type, a skill which has been invaluable in my career as an academic. I don’t think about where my fingers are going – in fact […]
23 February 2012

Drill and Rote in teaching LP and Hypothesis Testing

Drill and rote-learning are derogatory terms in many education settings. They have the musty taint of “old-fashioned” ways of teaching. They evoke images of wooden classrooms and tight-lipped spinsters dressed in grey looming over trembling pupils as they recite their times-tables. Drill and rote-learning imply mindless repetition, devoid of understanding. Much more attractive educational terms are “discovery”, “exploration”, “engagement”. Constructivism requires that learners engage with their materials and create learning by building on existing knowledge and experiences. But (and I’m sure you could see this coming) I think there is a place for something not far from drill or rote-learning […]